LILA 2010

Nov 01, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.

SANS TITRE 16

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE, 2008
Huile sur toile, 380 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.

SANS TITRE 15

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE
Huile sur toile

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.

SANS TITRE 8

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE
Huile sur toile

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.

CONSTANCE 9

Oct 12, 2010 Comments Off

CONSTANCE, 2005
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

CONSTANCE 6

Oct 11, 2010 Comments Off

CONSTANCE, 2008
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

CONSTANCE 5

Oct 11, 2010 Comments Off

CONSTANCE 5, 2009
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.

ANNE

Oct 05, 2010 No Comments

ANNE, 2005
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, Collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.