PHILIPPINE 2010

Nov 04, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, the taste for the  monumental goes hand in hand with an attraction towards what is most vulnerable – bodies and faces, sometimes with stigmatising differences that the artist adopts and magnifies through his painting: for example, portraits of transsexuals, people with Downs syndrome, or people who are blind.
Handicaps, differences, obscenity or the sacred: each canvas is the fruit of a struggle, a tension between what can be shown and “tolerated”, and what is socially repressed or concealed.
Sometimes it is models close to the artist, sometimes people met briefly during a photography session in a specialist institution or even a hospital.

CLEMENTINE

Nov 04, 2010 No Comments

CLEMENTINE, 2009
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

JOHN

Nov 04, 2010 Comments Off

JESSY, 2005
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, there is no difference between a portrait and a picture featuring an animal – in this case, one of the dogs that share his everyday life. The canvases are huge and of a startling beauty: a peaceful, calm, abandoned animal. A pose? No, a presence offered and a complex game where the animal becomes humanised and appears like an indolent Venus or a very modern and intriguing Olympia.

UNTITLED

Nov 04, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, the taste for the  monumental goes hand in hand with an attraction towards what is most vulnerable – bodies and faces, sometimes with stigmatising differences that the artist adopts and magnifies through his painting: for example, portraits of transsexuals, people with Downs syndrome, or people who are blind.
Handicaps, differences, obscenity or the sacred: each canvas is the fruit of a struggle, a tension between what can be shown and “tolerated”, and what is socially repressed or concealed.
Sometimes it is models close to the artist, sometimes people met briefly during a photography session in a specialist institution or even a hospital.

PURDEY

Nov 04, 2010 Comments Off

PURDEY, 2009
Huile sur toile, 200 x 400 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, there is no difference between a portrait and a picture featuring an animal – in this case, one of the dogs that share his everyday life. The canvases are huge and of a startling beauty: a peaceful, calm, abandoned animal. A pose? No, a presence offered and a complex game where the animal becomes humanised and appears like an indolent Venus or a very modern and intriguing Olympia.

With Philippe Pasqua, there is no difference between a portrait and a picture featuring an animal – in this case, one of the dogs that share his everyday life. The canvases are huge and of a startling beauty: a peaceful, calm, abandoned animal. A pose? No, a presence offered and a complex game where the animal becomes humanised and appears like an indolent Venus or a very modern and intriguing Olympia.

SANS TITRE 3

Nov 04, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE
Huile sur toile

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

SANS TITRE 2

Nov 04, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE, 2009
Huile sur toile, 250 x 150 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, the taste for the  monumental goes hand in hand with an attraction towards what is most vulnerable – bodies and faces, sometimes with stigmatising differences that the artist adopts and magnifies through his painting: for example, portraits of transsexuals, people with Downs syndrome, or people who are blind.
Handicaps, differences, obscenity or the sacred: each canvas is the fruit of a struggle, a tension between what can be shown and “tolerated”, and what is socially repressed or concealed.
Sometimes it is models close to the artist, sometimes people met briefly during a photography session in a specialist institution or even a hospital.

LILA 2010

Nov 01, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.

VANITE 2

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

VANITÉ, 2009
Techniques différentes sur papier, 250 x 200 cm

Collection privée

The artist reproduces his own works on facsimiles of school exercise book pages, or on blank sheets of paper. He plays with formats: a large initial drawing can be reduced in size, whereas a sketch is increased in size out of all proportion. Each work session is like an unrestricted ceremony of fun. The painter spreads out the pages on the ground, and then alters, retouches and smudges them. He prowls round them, like a shaman throwing his spells and his medicinal herbs into a fire, sprays them with drippings of colour.
Palimpsests: one figure emerges, then fades away while another appears.

SANS TITRE 16

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE, 2008
Huile sur toile, 380 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

On the surface of the canvas there are nothing but projections of matter – marks, thick daubs of paint, criss-crossed or formless touches. A certain distance is needed for the image to emerge.
When Philippe Pasqua paints bodies, he seems to interfere with the skin. It is as if he turned it back, or led our gaze through it. What appears is something along the lines of blood pressure, tendon, muscle, and the circulation of energies and humours. The flesh, then, more than the skin. And the body – nothing but the body: little or no clothing, no décor (with the exception sometimes of an armchair or a draped curtain). Everything is concentrated – our gaze as well as the painter’s – on a fleeting attitude, a moment of tension or complete relaxation, like an offering.