PHILIPPINE 2010

Nov 04, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, the taste for the  monumental goes hand in hand with an attraction towards what is most vulnerable – bodies and faces, sometimes with stigmatising differences that the artist adopts and magnifies through his painting: for example, portraits of transsexuals, people with Downs syndrome, or people who are blind.
Handicaps, differences, obscenity or the sacred: each canvas is the fruit of a struggle, a tension between what can be shown and “tolerated”, and what is socially repressed or concealed.
Sometimes it is models close to the artist, sometimes people met briefly during a photography session in a specialist institution or even a hospital.

CLEMENTINE

Nov 04, 2010 No Comments

CLEMENTINE, 2009
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

UNTITLED

Nov 04, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, the taste for the  monumental goes hand in hand with an attraction towards what is most vulnerable – bodies and faces, sometimes with stigmatising differences that the artist adopts and magnifies through his painting: for example, portraits of transsexuals, people with Downs syndrome, or people who are blind.
Handicaps, differences, obscenity or the sacred: each canvas is the fruit of a struggle, a tension between what can be shown and “tolerated”, and what is socially repressed or concealed.
Sometimes it is models close to the artist, sometimes people met briefly during a photography session in a specialist institution or even a hospital.

SANS TITRE 3

Nov 04, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE
Huile sur toile

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

SANS TITRE 2

Nov 04, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE, 2009
Huile sur toile, 250 x 150 cm

Paris, collection privée

With Philippe Pasqua, the taste for the  monumental goes hand in hand with an attraction towards what is most vulnerable – bodies and faces, sometimes with stigmatising differences that the artist adopts and magnifies through his painting: for example, portraits of transsexuals, people with Downs syndrome, or people who are blind.
Handicaps, differences, obscenity or the sacred: each canvas is the fruit of a struggle, a tension between what can be shown and “tolerated”, and what is socially repressed or concealed.
Sometimes it is models close to the artist, sometimes people met briefly during a photography session in a specialist institution or even a hospital.

CONSTANCE 8

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

CONSTANCE, 2008
Huile sur toile, 200 x 160 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

SANS TITRE

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

SANS TITRE, 2009
Huile sur toile, 250 x 200 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

AUTOPORTRAIT

Oct 13, 2010 Comments Off

AUTOPORTRAIT, 2009
Huile sur toile, 200 x 250 cm

Paris, collection privée

Painting is a struggle, a hand-to-hand fight that demands an adversary (or a partner) at the height of his or her wildest ambitions. For some, it will be a landscape, a still life; for others, a live model. And sometimes, it can happen that this model is none other than the painter himself.
An image of the self caught in a mirror or a photograph…  The painter pulls a face or remains impassive, looking at himself from a distance as though he were someone else.
Then the hand-to-hand fight with the self begins – a struggle where the gaze probes the self and observes. Until the artist lays down his arms and lets himself be absorbed by the space in the picture and melt into the painting, becoming the very matter of his passion.

UNTITLED

Oct 12, 2010 No Comments

UNTITLED, 2010
huile sur toile – 400 X 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.

LILA

Oct 12, 2010 Comments Off

LILA, 2010
Huile sur toile, 400 x 260 cm

Paris, collection privée

Along with Yan Pei Ming, Jenny Saville and Marlène Dumas, Philippe Pasqua is one of those artists who is renewing the art of the portrait, breathing prodigious energy into it.
He paints adults and children whom he has known for a long time, or those he has just met. These are usually large-format canvases, which can be a big as four or five metres long or high. He concentrates on the faces to the exclusion of all other details which would get in the way of the emergence of the image. A straight look or eyes closed, a smile or a provocative grimace – they always have a stunning and immediate intensity.